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Showing posts from February, 2012

NEW CAT OR KITTEN? WHAT'S NEXT?

Before you get a new kitten or adopt an adult cat, make sure you complete your education about kitty education. 

If you are already living with an untrained cat with existing problems, simply designate today as the first day at Kitty College for both of you. Kitten training techniques work perfectly well with adult cats.
Check that the kitten was raised indoors, around human companionship and influence. Ask the breeder how many strangers, especially including men and children, have handled and gentled the kittens.  Spend at least an hour observing, playing with, and hugging and handling (restraining and examining), your prospective kitten. 
At eight weeks of age, kitten activity recycles every 40 minutes so. To get a representative feel for your kitten's overall demeanor, make sure that you observe her while she sleeps, when she plays, and when she is wild. 


Check that the kitten already uses a litter box and plays with her scratching post.








Choosing an adult cat is a very personal choi…

VALENTINE'S DAY TOXINS TO PETS

It’s the Love month!

Love is in the air for many of us, but sometimes the wrong kind of love can put our pets in danger!
The following are common toxins that are frequently seen during Valentine’s Day.
 Some common Toxins to pets:

• Lilies: frequently sold in Flower Shops and delivered for this special day. The toxin in this beautiful flower can be found in the petals, leaves, pollen or in the vase water. Lilies are extremely toxic to cats. They can cause acute kidney failure within one or two days of exposure. If not treated, death is likely. Ingestion of just one or two leaves or petals is enough to kill a cat. For dogs, usually just mild Gastrointestinal upset is seen. The signs of lily toxicity include:
o Salivation
o Vomiting
o Reduced appetite
o Lethargy

• Chocolate: How much chocolate is deadly?
The main toxic ingredient, theobromine is a chemical similar to caffeine but it’s highly toxic to both dogs and cats. The darker the chocolate, the more dangerous as it contains more t…

NATIONAL PET DENTAL MONTH CONTINUES!

Thanks for reading our Article on National Pet Dental. I hope you enjoyed the Video on how to brush your dog's teeth. I hope all your pooches out there will sit that still!


To continue further into educating people in the importance of Dental Therapy Procedures for pets, I wanted to share with you a Video that was found on line.


This Video is for those of you who may wonder if it is safe to have your pet's teeth scaled without anesthesia?? We've all heard of the companies that are around town giving dogs a "dental" without anesthesia.


While you may form your own opinion of course, this is also simply my opinion.
I do not agree with, nor will I ever, having a dental procedure done on an animal who is not anesthetized.


I recently saw a client who had 4 dogs all over the age of 10 yrs. All four had severe periodontal disease. I looked at all the dogs and informed my client of the dental disease. Her reply to me was, "That can't be! I just had all their tee…

NATIONAL PET DENTAL MONTH IS HERE!

FEBRUARY IS NATIONAL PET DENTAL
AWARENESS MONTH!

Do you know what it really entails to clean a pet’s teeth?

Please read all the way down. There is a video at the end of this article that demonstrates an actual teeth brushing on a dog.

Often, people hold off too long on caring for their pet’s teeth. Some of the most common reasons are:


• Cost of the Periodontal Therapy (anywhere from $300-$,1,000) or more!
• Unable to make time for appointment (simple as adjusting your work or home schedule for just one morning and one afternoon)
• Not educated in serious problems that can occur when you don’t care for your pet’s teeth!
Signs of Dental Disease include:
• Foul breath
• Drooling
• Chewing food on only one side of the mouth
• Pawing at mouth and/or rubbing face on floor or carpet
• Trying to bite when you touch around face (sign of pain)
• Always acting hungry (because they are unable to eat with bad teeth)
• Not wanting to eat (hurts to eat)
There are four stages of gum disease.


1. Stage 1- presents …

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