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The dangers of retractable leashes


The dangers of retractable leashes


Image courtesy of Mister GC at 
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Why are retractable leashes harmful?
Do you walk your dog with a retractable leash?

Retractable leashes have been popular for a long time. Pet owners like that their dogs have more freedom to roam while on walks. The walker can reel them in whenever they choose to call them back.

Right? Not always.
Below is just one scenario of the dangers retractable leashes can cause your pet, r you or another pet or human harm.

Scenario One
You are walking your dog on his retractable leash when out of nowhere another dog appears from 10 feet away. Do you have time to reel your dog in on his retractable leash if the other dog is acting aggressively or negatively to your dog, or worse, to you? Nope.... you don't.

The danger is; that if the dogs react negatively to each other and you have a long line attached to your dog’s neck you will not be able to move quickly enough to reel him back to you. Too quickly the two dogs begin fighting and one or both become can become entangled in the leash line.
There is a great probability for one or both dogs to become seriously injured. The handler can also become seriously injured by having the leash torn from his/her hand with the force of the dog on the other end of it.

I'd like to keep my thumbs!
Image courtesy of Mister GC at 
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There have been reported incidents that people who have found themselves in this predicament have received painful leash burns, lost fingers, have received deep lacerations and even arms being pulled out of their sockets. There is also the strong possibility that if your dog sees a bird, squirrel or other small animal and decides to take off to investigate further that he pulls the leash out of your hand and runs straight in to traffic. This can be deadly for your dog.

Retractable leashes are often dropped easily due to their cumbersomeness. This causes a hurdling effect towards your dog and can easily strike your dog in the head. When this happens it can easily and completely understandably, spook your dog with the possibility of him running off. If a person is not paying attention and this happens most commonly their first reaction is to grab the leash. This can cause injury to the hand causing severe leash burns and even amputation of entangled fingers.

Scenario Two
The veterinary field sees many retractable leashes being used by clients on their dogs. Clients bring their pets to the veterinarian and sometimes behave as as if they're at the park thus letting their dogs have the freedom of full length on their retractable leash. Not only is this dangerous it’s irresponsible.
Image courtesy of Mister GC at 
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Pet owners are often at the veterinary clinic with their pet because the pet is sick. They don't want your dog approaching without permission but sadly it happens often.
There are dogs that are not "Dog/Socially friendly" so when a dog who has free rein on a lengthy leash approaches another dog there is a possibility of a negative interaction between the two. That brings us back to the dangers of entanglement, lost fingers and serious leash burns.
Free roaming dogs on retractable leashes in the veterinary practice is not only impolite to the other pet owners but to the staff as well. They know the dangers. Now they have to watch your pet even closer.

So the conclusion is? 
Retractable leashes are not only unsafe for your dog but they are unsafe for you as well.

What leash is recommended?
A sturdy nylon or leather leash is suggested. The leashes have a “Hand/Loop” for you to hold on to and they come in all lengths. They are safe, durable and easy to use. The leashes are best used along with a safe harness. Let's hope that most of you will in the very least, consider changing from a retractable leash to a sturdy nylon or leather leash! See some of our suggestions here: Dog Harness/Leash

Thanks pet friends!

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